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Ospho treated metal

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  • #31
    The origin and treatment of the sand may affect results. I could see where some sands might have a high sodium content which would be pretty bad for steel.

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    • #32
      I've had sandblasted parts sitting in the shop for close to a year with absolutely no surface rust even showing...other than where they may have been handled for moving. Dont ask why they are still sitting there with no epoxy on them. LOL. When we were using sand for blasting, we only used the extra-fine blasting sand provided from the local (right down the road) concrete facility. No longer using sand due to the dhec laws being put in place(not to mention the health hazards) ....trying to pass laws that say if you have a bag of sand laying in your shop its $1,000 a bag fine, unless you are certified to use sand. We are the only shop in the surrounding area certified to use sand for open area blasting...You are fine if it is contained in a containment booth..but the way they talk with new laws it wouldn't be that way soon...so we just quit. Got tired of spending the money, once you fix something they come at you with something else. We Use extra fine black beauty and crushed glass now.

      Honestly never even heard of the potential rust problems by using sand until shine started mentioning it. Certainly didn't hear it from our media suppliers. I'll take his word for it, since we dont use the stuff anymore and he definitely has the more experience in that field. But personaly havent seen any adverse affects directly dealing with the use of sand for blasting. Who cares now though....combine those statements with the added health risks from using sand....its pretty much a no brainer not to use it. Live and learn.
      http://www.elitecustoms.net

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      • #33
        it was explained to me by the media supplier who had at least 75 samples of media in bottles. bottom line was he had no control over what the sand was or contained. he explained how most of it would contain caustic salts and such. i'll take his word for it that sand is the last thing i wanted to use in refinishing. better, safer cleaner medias available. use what you like i'll shut up now.
        SPI Thug !

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        • #34
          That makes some sense to me. All the blasting sand around me is Michigan sand from the big lakes. This sand might be a low mineral content which might be whey we never had trouble with it.

          When I lead I use a baking soda and water mix to remove the acids from the fluxing process. I wash the fluxed surface and then I rewash the lead repair with baking soda followed by simple green spray washed up with Dawn and rinsed really good. I used to have some trouble before I washed the fluxed area. Some of that acid would be on the flux surface and the lead would bury the contaminated surface. You know what happens in 6mos with trapped acid.

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          • #35
            I find it interesting shine.. I've sen some issues at pinch welds on sand blasted pieces before, so wouldn't mind something else..
            I don't know of any other media supplier around here though.

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            • #36
              Chad, Menards carries a black beauty type blasting media that is slag of some sort. I use it a lot. Seems like it's 6 bucks a 50lbs bag. I buy sand for 6 bucks a 100 lbs. It's aggressive, costs more than sand, but cuts faster. Tractor supply carries a media that is similar but the one around me never carries the right grit so I go to Menards. I'd buy the 50 pounders for twice as much just because I don't like lugging 100 pound bags out back to blast.

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              • #37
                Only thing i dont like about BB is the coarsness. Even the extra fine is just too coarse for sheetmetal IMO. Its great for frames and underbodys as it will remove just about anything it hits. We only use recycled crushed glass on exterior sheetmetal parts. If there is a real rusty area we will spot with the bb. The glass is just about the best i've found that gives you the same clean white metal that extra fine sand will give you. Might not be the "quickest" media....but quickness is not at the top of my list when it comes to blasting.
                http://www.elitecustoms.net

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                • #38
                  The black blast isn't bad, but because it is so coarse, it doesn't do a great job of removing rust pitting. Takes a while blasting the same area before enough of the smaller pieces in the mix remove the pits.
                  Chris

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                  • #39
                    would blasting with fine grit crushed glass take the ospho off as well? will it create any rust problems later on like using regular sand?

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                    • #40
                      the crushed recycled glass is fantastic and all i use here. i got off the bb a long time ago. with bb its very easy to warp sheetmetal with it. www.newageblastmedia.com
                      all spi gallery: www.xtremekreations.com

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                      • #41
                        South Florida is a pretty humid place but I use glass bead and have left parts unpainted for months with no sign of rust. Used sand years ago and the parts rusted up the same day.

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                        • #42
                          Hey Jim, How much is the newage for a 80lb bag? Looks like a good alternative for sheetmetal. I couldn't see replacing bb on a frame due to the quick nature,but I bet it is good on a body. I used bb on the entire body and fenders of an aluminum body car and never warped a panel including around the alum hood side louvers. Low pressure, practice, and patience. I wouldn't recommend a newbie blaster to try it though.

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                          • #43
                            it comes in 50lb bags or a 3000lb sack. obviously by the sack its much cheaper per lb. i get it in the bags just because i have just a pot blaster and its easier to handle in bags. cost for the stuff depends on how much you buy. i believe my price on a 50lb bag is around $7. i buy usually 2 pallets at a time which is 2000lb ea. i have tried and tried to warp sheetmetal with the stuff just to see if i could and i havent been able to do it.
                            all spi gallery: www.xtremekreations.com

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                            • #44
                              I wish we had that stuff available in this area.

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                              • #45
                                i know they ship pallets nationwide since they supply they navy ship yards and all the companies blasting and maintaining bridges. thats the majority of their business. the shipping just adds to the cost though. you can call them bob to atleast see what they can do pricewise. i know they will work with you a little on the pricing to help cover the shipping. pretty good people to deal with. the owner and guy you want to talk to there is steve. you'll want the medium size grit.
                                all spi gallery: www.xtremekreations.com

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