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Clearing Lexan

EddieF

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#1
Anyone do it? I got (removed from my windows) 8 2'x5' 1/2" thick actual Lexan sheets that turned like sun beaten headlights after 15yrs.
I ask because i've read acetone is bad news on polycarb.
Headlights aren't polycarb or they'd dent not crack.
Thinking clearing them would help prevent sun damage. ?
 
#2
Headlamps are polycarbonate. We get the best results by sanding quite a bit off until it's certain that the oxidized material and any protective coating is totally removed. I think he starts with 320 and refines them out to 2000 grit in steps. Then we use Universal with Slow activator because it has less acetone than some of the other stuff. Extra Slow might even be better but we have not tried that. This produces maximum clarity, but I would think to have them be usable as windows again, you'd also have to color sand and polish them.
 

EddieF

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#3
Crash yes i would do as i did headlights, stopping at 6 or 800.
Headlights i did that way with uvc extra slow look like glass no buff.
Reason i say headlights aren't polycarb is they crack. Polycarb sheets can be bent in a brake.
Doesn't break. I've folded over 1/8" sheet & no stress cracks. Can hit with hammer & dents, not break.
 
#4
Well, I don't know if there are different grades of PC, but every source I've ever seen says that headlamp lenses are made from it, but with a coating that resists scratches and UV.

I don't think it would hurt to try one of those sheets with the same process, though it might result in a slight amount of embrittlement. Barry might be willing to reveal confidentially on the phone whether the Extra Slow has acetone, I'm guessing if it does it is a very small %.
 
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