• Having site issues? Contact Dub@southernPolyurethanes.com

Curing lamps

#1
Something has been nagging me. But, enough about my wife.

If the Universal tech sheet says to bake at 110-120 for 10-15 minutes. How does this change with lamps, either med or short (there really isn't that big of a difference in the two).
Is temperature as important with radiant as it is with ambient curing?

Thanks
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
#2
Wondering a little bit about heat lamps myself lately since looking into getting a few for repairs, so been doing a little research.
Medium wave units, such as infratech's seem to be the most common sold for auto repairs. If I understand correctly, short wave is less efficient on power usage & generally runs hotter temps & not as even of a heating output as the tubular medium bulbs. But with either type what output model, how many, & how close to get wanted output would be as much of a factor as anything according to someone I spoke to at a single source store, which mentioned making my own setup with clamp on lamps & round bulbs to be an option.
I think common sense would say the worst thing would be having too much heat, especially too soon.
But that's research knowledge only, not firsthand.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#3
Shortwave should 95% cure two coats of clear in about 15 minutes.
A medium wave should do about the same in 30 to 45 minutes.

The safe way to do this keep the metal temp 110 to 120.
 
#4
This is just my own experience, and disobey Barry at your own risk, but I have found that as long as temps are ramped up slowly, towards the end of the cure, 140° is not a problem. It would be a problem to slam it up to that immediately, though. I know that surfaces can get well over that temp on a hot sunny day, for sure.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#5
Crash, I could see that working!
But I can also see 2-inch diam bubbles if brought up to temp to fast.
 
#6
We take some risks during cold weather because the humidity tends to be very low here. Bumpers covers that have to be flipped on their faces to assemble, for example, need to be cured up pretty well before handling. These will cure overnight at normal room temps but still need quite a bit of heat lamping the next morning.

I ought to invest in a shortwave lamp someday, seems like they make a world of difference.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#7
I have a shortwave I bought about 15 years ago and back then it cost about $1500 best I can remember give or take.
It is very bulky but I liked it so much I sold my two medium waves and the baby handheld shortwave.
So many tricks and things you can do with these I don't know how any shop could not have one.
 

EddieF

Top Banana
#9
if short & medium wave were same watts side by side, would short wave be brighter to the eye?
Just wondering after all reading and tinkering i've done with different infrared leds for therapy, security cams, ect.
Shorter is brighter, long wave gets to end of what us humans see.
 
#11
I put in some research on this a while back and ended up buying the Infratech SR-1615-HT "high intensity" medium wave rather than a short wave. The higher output over the standard medium wave was attractive and the fragile nature of a short wave had me a little concerned (I am accident prone!). Also, the SW get up to temp so fast whereas the MW tend to ramp up slower (From memory). I'm just a hobby guy but the lamp sure is a nice thing to have around. Can't imagine a pro not finding one useful.
 

EddieF

Top Banana
#14
If any of you techy guys speak with a maker of heaters, ask if they know Nm (wavelength) range. It's a number like 650 or lower up to 1000's. Eyes don't see much beyond 750nm (deep red).
Set on low & give your back muscles 15min therapy session. Don't stare at it.
 
Last edited:

jlcustomz

evil painter
#15
Before I get into actual expensive fixtures, got one of these phillips bulbs and a metal clamp/hanging light with guard from homestore to play with on a mahogany wood door repair at work. Definitely need to grab me an infared temperature gauge to fully use it carefully. For what I personally need in my day job, I may be better off making my own setup with a row or double row of these. I don't see any of the infared specs listed though, but I assume this is a shortwave?
https://www.amazon.com/Philips-Heat-Lamp-Flood-Light/dp/B0066L0YJE
 
#17
@Danny23 , yup, that's the difference. I originally cheaped out and rapidly regretted it! If you want to go super cheap while saving up for a half-decent lamp, you might try @jlcustomz advice just above. They used to make lamp stands for those with multiple lamp sockets, but I don't think they make them anymore. In the olden days, we used to put regular flood lamps in the fixtures to light the paint area, provide some heat, and protect against blushing. You'd be surprised at how much warmth seven 250W floodlamps can put out, even if they aren't infrared lamps. They say even regular incandescent bulbs put out 90% heat and 10% light!
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
#19
Wondering what the main difference is between red & clear on the screw in infared bulbs?

Our local light bulb depot store also has 375 watt bulbs in clear &red. Couldn't get anybody last trip there that knew crap about infared bulbs.
 

EddieF

Top Banana
#20
My guess red heats deeper? I wonder too how clear bulbs are listed under infrared.
I suppose clear has infrared along with all the shorter waves when combined makes white-ish.
Remote control for tv uses infrared light above our range. They're above 900Nm.
Put your finger over end of remote infront of a security cam in night mode. See right thru finger.
 
Top