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Paint stripper and lead/body solder

#1
I am using Kleen Strip Aircraft paint stripper to remove the factory laquer primer on the quarter panels of a '55 Chevy. (Definitely NOT my preferred method.)
I now realize that I have gotten some of the stripper on the leaded joints where the quarter panel meets the panel under the rear window and also
where it joins under the taillight. Is this going to be a problem? I am concerned the lead may "soak up" the stripper and be contaminated.
Do you guys know if I need to remove the lead now? Thanks
 
#2
There might be some hidden corrosion going on under that lead, and if there is there could be a path for stripper to creep into the tiny gap between the lead and the steel, but the metal itself will not absorb the stripper. I usually remove lead because of the light corrosion that is often under it.
 
#3
55 chev-Nice! I'd remove the solder and redo to be on the safe side but if it looks good with no darkness around the edges you won't have anything to worry about with the stripper. Make sure to do a good water wash when you're done with the chemical stripper to neutralize any remaining residue.
 
#4
Thanks for the replies, guys. Remove the lead = remove the worry.
My concern if I remove the lead/solder is what to replace it with as I am inexperienced with lead work. (Would love to learn, just not on a customers car)
I have researched the forum and it appears they are patching over the seams that are normally leaded in, or cutting them out entirely and patching.
I would not have a problem patching over the seam if I can get behind it somehow after it is done to get some epoxy or cavity wax in there to protect it but
would rather not cut the seam out entirely.
What is the best method to replace using lead in a previously leaded seam? Thanks
 
#5
Evercoat makes a metal to metal, or metal 2 metal, its aluminum and they claim its the closest thing to lead. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/fge-889?seid=srese1&gclid=CJuo3ZzSwMECFSyCMgodGH0Ang

Otherwise there are kits out there to relead like this, http://www.tptools.com/Starter-Auto-Body-LeadandSolder-Kit,7456.html

You can still get solder bars from mcmaster carr though, http://www.mcmaster.com/#7663a12/=u9i2ky in 50/50, but most are leaning toward tin kits and anyone that has used lead free solder knows it needs to be alot hotter than that 50/50 that is probably on the car. http://www.mcmaster.com/#7663a14/=u9i37y this is the 60/40 thats a little more workable with less lead.



Just remember to protect yourself and those around you if you are melting out the lead from the seams.
 
#6
No one should confuse polyester filler that contains aluminum particles for an actual lead substitute.

Many good restorers are simply welding a piece of formed metal over the old leaded area so fillers are either eliminated or minimized.
 
#8
70% lead, 30% tin is what is used for auto body. Getting less available and more expensive. There used to be 80/20 but haven't seen that in decades. The higher lead ratio reacts slower to the heat making it easier to work.
 
#11
Thanks to everyone that replied and shared their knowledge. A lot of good info and experience to draw upon.
This winter I have another 'lead related' job coming in (a '66 Mustang that the quarter-to-roof joints looks like wrinkled prunes under the paint)
so I am sure I will be back on here asking questions about that. Thanks, guys.
 
#12
Thanks to everyone that replied and shared their knowledge. A lot of good info and experience to draw upon.
This winter I have another 'lead related' job coming in (a '66 Mustang that the quarter-to-roof joints looks like wrinkled prunes under the paint)
so I am sure I will be back on here asking questions about that. Thanks, guys.
Curious what you ended up doing with the seam and how it turned out? Thanks!
 
#13
I melted the lead out, fully welded the seam, epoxy, fabricated a patch to smooth over the seam, epoxy on back side and welded it in.
Epoxy on top and only needed a skim coat of filler. No worries.
 
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