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Painting motobase nassau blue in pieces long term

#1
I have been reading and trying to remember all the info on this forum relating to my paint project.
My spraying experience to date is one test fender sprayed per perfect paint job. First I have looked at the motobase tech sheet online and there was no mention of sanding nibs, adding activator or max window from base to clear what is your experience? What I would prefer to do is spray and clear in pieces due to lack of space and using 60 gal. tank with 3 hp single stage compressor. To me (imo) I don't think Nassau blue has so much metallic that I would have trouble with panels matching but again I have not achieved the rank of rookie yet! I was encouraged with the outcome of the test fender, base, 3 coats clear, sand with 3 more clear coats. What do you think?
Thanks for any info,
Don
 

elwood

Registered Users
#2
If metallic then make sure pieces are painted the way they will be positioned on the car. Hood flat, doors standing up, etc. Metallics are little more difficult to spray separate and have it look "right".
 
#3
To me it is not a strong metallic so I was hoping it would be more forgiving as far as a matching. Setting up and spraying as you suggest sounds like a step in the right direction. Thanks
 

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Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#4
I have been playing with that color and i will guarantee you with the 3 hp when all put together it will not match.
This color changes just with humidity
And not even considering change
in air pressure.
 
#5
Thanks for the reply, I was hoping that I only needed worry about the metallic but it sounds like this color will be more difficult than I would have ever thought. I already have the paint so i am committed to me spray it or have someone else spray it. I have only sprayed exoxy and primer on different sections of the car as I stripping and prepping for paint. So I did in sections one at a time roof, hood, both front fenders, trunk lid, right quarter, left quarter. Wold it be possible to spray in pieces on the same day (to be consistent with humidity ) and doing in sections giving compressor time to maintain pressure? I would probably like spray to roof separate on another day if I could get away with it as far as matching.
 
#10
i have done 2 vettes in nassau blue. one was in diamont base and the other with wanda. i have always sprayed cars apart. they are never together. hood and trunk are usually hanging as well so not orientated the same as they sit on the car. i did both of these no different than i would paint any other color and everything matched perfectly. other brands of paint may be different. i have no idea.
 
#13
I don't plan on doing this again. If I would rather have someone spray it than buy a compressor. Altough I think I should see what is available to rent. My spi dealer offered to rent his booth I think I will ask him for details.
My original plan was to get body ready buy stripping and priming in pieces (57 chevy ht) and have someone paint it. But the more I work on it I would really like to be able to say that I painted the car. I like doing things myself if I can do it right
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#14
It is always a hit or miss when spraying metallic's or heavy pearl colors a panel at a time, most restro or rod shops that do this will get all the panels coated in base and then dummy mount panels the on car and spray one coat for match and take apart and clear.
Yes it can be pulled off without the extra work sometimes but a lot of factors out of your control.
 
#15
A larger compressor is going to cost you a lot less than having someone spray it for you!
JimC is way out of my league and a true professional yet I spray cars in pieces all the time as well. You will need the compressor so your air pressure doesn't fluctuate while spraying. This will cause differences in the atomization of the paint (droplet size) and how it lays on the surface.
Consistency is the key to having all the panels match. Same gun, pressure, distance, speed, overlap and number of coats applied. I always spray a minimum of 3 coats of color and with motobase, pro spray, diamont and other quality paints have never had a problem.
 
#16
I appreciate and trust the advice received. At the time I bought the compressor to do this '57 I thought it would serve my needs to get my car ready for paint. Until I found this forum I didn't realize the quantity of air that was needed to spray a whole car.

68, Do you or anyone know the window from base to base and base to clear on motobase? Did not list on
their spec sheet online. If it were long enough I could spray 3 coats in pieces assemble and have someone spray final coat. Also can motobase be lightly sanded to denib?
 
#17
Here's the information I have:


Nozzle size:
Gravity gun: HVLP: 1.3 – 1.4 mm High pressure: 1.3 – 1.4 mm
Suction gun: HVLP: 1.6 mm High pressure: 1.4 – 1.6 mm
Spraying pressure:
HVLP: 2.0 – 3.0 bar (30 – 45 psi) See Info Manufacturer
High pressure: 3 - 4 bar (45 - 60 p.s.i.)


Total re-spray: Apply by spray gun 2 ½ to 3 coats using normal spraying motion, observe flash off time of 5 to 15 minutes between coats or until matt.

Coat Thickness: 15-25μm (0.6-1.0mil)

Blending In: When repairing a two-stage metallic finish, you have to pre-spray the area to be refinished with reduced 8LV-87 (as a blending clear) to make sure that the effect particles in the blend-in area settles properly:
1. Clean with Automotive Art Universal Cleaner 20-95.
2. Sand for adhesion and clean again
3. Cover damaged area with 2 – 3 coats of Motobase 8LV Line, pressure to approx. 2.0 – 3.0 bar (30 – 45 p.s.i.) Flash off until mat.
4. Apply one spray coat of 8LV-87 – 2 parts to 1 part Reducer (as a blending clear) on the adjacent area as previously stated in the manual.
5. With reduced pressure at approx. 1.5 – 2.0 bar (22 – 30 p.s.i.), apply Motobase 8LV Line to damaged area fading out on to surrounding surface.
6. Leave to flash off until mat before applying 1 or 2 thin spray coats of 92-50 clear to the whole part including the repair area.
7. If the area cannot be masked, the clear must be blended in. After lightly spray a blending reducer at the edge.
8. After drying, the area must be polished. Be sure to scuff the entire blending area prior to spraying.

Flash Off time:
10 - 15 min. at 20°C. (68°F)

Drying Time:
15 - 20 min. at 20°C (68°F)
Can be taped after 20 - 45 minutes.
To be finished with HS Clear 92-50

Note: I do not follow flash times specifically since my booth temps can be in the 90s during the summer months. If you watch the panel you will see it flashing off and once it is done you can shoot another coat. As for when to spray the clear I most often wait until the next day.

Personally, I doubt you will find any painter that will just shoot your final coats for you. If you do, it will most certainly come with no warranty or guarantee of satisfaction.
 
#18
Thanks 68, that's all I found online. You are right, If I could find someone to spray final coat I would expect a decent outcome and surely no warranty. No sure if I would get one even if spraying all the coats over my primer. Since you have used motorbase do you activate, denib or ever cleared after more than a day?
 
#19
I always activate my base coat.
If you have to mess with the base coat just remember to spray the area with more base when done.
I normally never have to leave base coat more than a day before clearing but guys who do graphics and such have been know to leave it for days.
In your case, I would not advocate for leaving a car in base coat until you can find someone to spray it. Much better to do your body and prep work, then seal with epoxy if you plan to have pieces laying around for a while.
You can contact Chad Sperry and I am sure he could give you more specifics on the Motobase products.
 
#20
I always activate my base coat.
If you have to mess with the base coat just remember to spray the area with more base when done.
I normally never have to leave base coat more than a day before clearing but guys who do graphics and such have been know to leave it for days.
In your case, I would not advocate for leaving a car in base coat until you can find someone to spray it. Much better to do your body and prep work, then seal with epoxy if you plan to have pieces laying around for a while.
You can contact Chad Sperry and I am sure he could give you more specifics on the Motobase products.
 
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