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Painting with Open Flame

#1
Anybody seen this Youtube video?
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Maybe I'm missing something there, but near the end of the video he is spraying clear with a open flame propane burner running right next to where he's painting. I suppose it could be water borne base, but I don't understand why the place didn't go up in flames with clear. Maybe that's the solution to spraying when it's too cold outside ;) I won't even go into all the other issues, too many to comment.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#3
I have seen this done in shops along with torpedo types 100's of times, I would not do it but guess it works.
I can think of better ways of of exiting this world.

When I'm training someone in the blending side, one of the things I tell them is you could smoke a cigarette while making a 300 to a 750 gallon batch but if you want to die young, drop a wrench or something on the floor to cause a spark.

Also, some very high vapor manufacturers will have a gas flame running 24 hours a day mounted higher up on a wall for safety.

Mot sure this really answers any questions but may be related to the original question.
 
#4
There is this old trick with racers. Put a match to gasoline, it burns, to alcohol, it burns, to nitromethane, the flame goes out. I have sprayed WD-40 onto a flame to make a torch, have not tried it with automotive paint. I might worry with basecoat being 2:1, but no reducer in SPI clear might not even burn.
 
#5
I've painted a car in a barn before using salamanders for heat, but I warmed it up and shut the heaters off shot a coat, waited for the mist to clear then fired the heaters back up while that coat was flashing. I'm a little leery of even shooting spots of primer with any fire in the shop.
 
#6
Years a go when I had a large collision shop we hired a painted who was from West Virginia him and his dad worked in a 4 bay shop with an old potbelly wood stove and sprayed all day long for years no problem. Not me for sure! I am sure the conditions have to be perfect for a explosion to happen.
 
#9
I would think it all depends on ventilation. When my fans are running you can watch the over spray exit the booth almost immediately. However when I close up the booth to retain the heat overnight, the next morning the fumes are very strong. I open the garage door and windows to flush the fumes out before turning any heaters on.
 
#14
I would think it all depends on ventilation. When my fans are running you can watch the over spray exit the booth almost immediately. However when I close up the booth to retain the heat overnight, the next morning the fumes are very strong. I open the garage door and windows to flush the fumes out before turning any heaters on.
The fumes are most probably going to be easier to burn than the clear out of the gun. It is my biggest worry, since you cannot leave the fan on after spraying the clear or you will wrinkle the paint.

I did get into an argument with one of those loss book guys from the insurance company. He wants rags in a container, where they are actually more prone to catch on fire when they are bundled together with solvent on them than if they were spread off over the floor in a 15,000 square foot shop. I got the containers, just waiting to find out.
 
#15
i use paper towels . they get thrown on the floor by the can. once they are dried out they go into the trash .
there is a concentration level of fumes that will ignite. never been there so have no idea but there have been garages burnt down from gas fumes and gas water heaters . i never liked attached garages.