Tech line problems.

Dean Jenkins

Promoted Users
I've been using the TCP global cups, no issues. I feel a little wasteful because I never clean and reuse, just toss them. But time is valuable, right?
 

AAE

Learner
The scientist in me can barely stand the idea of mixing in a cup. The graduations remain equally spaced despite the fact that the volume is greatly INCREASING with the taper of the cup. JHC, even Pampered Chef can get it right with a cylindrical measuring cup. And yeah, this is all assuming the printing on the cup is done to any degree of accuracy.

That's why, in the lab, we call them, graduated cylinders.

I'd like to invent a perfect cylindrical mixing cup, with embossed graduations in the plastic (or they could be printed I guess, but graduations built into the mold will always be accurate), and then you simply slip a thin disposable liner into the cup to mix your paint. Done mixing, pull out the liner and toss.
The first generation 3m paint prep cups had this but the insert stayed in between the outer cup and liner. Much better than the 2.0.
 

Lizer

Mad Scientist
I've been using the TCP global cups, no issues. I feel a little wasteful because I never clean and reuse, just toss them. But time is valuable, right?
Just let them sit for a few days. Once the paint dries it peels and flakes right off. An air compressor blowgun has it clean in about 15 seconds.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
I've been using the TCP global cups, no issues. I feel a little wasteful because I never clean and reuse, just toss them. But time is valuable, right?
I've tried what Lizer posted above a long time ago. Too messy for me. Remnants go everywhere and it doesn't always all come off. Every place I've worked at we clean them at the time we are mixing. Probably just as economical to toss them as it is to clean them.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
Thinking about what happened yesterday, two things bother me.

First, the shop that called said they were buying 4 to 5 extra activators because one was not enough per gallon.
That old math or new is a 2.1 mix.

The second thing I thought about was I had two shops a month or so-called that 3100 with fast activator were gelling in the cup right away.
I never thought about asking what mixing cup they used.
I mixed up the two batches and could not create the problem.
I sent pictures, but other than that, had no real answers, and one said he would go back to ppg.
Dont remember who the shops were. I won't make that mistake again.
Live and learn!
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
Lots of guys don't have a basic understanding of ratios. I've encountered that multiple times when training or working with guys over the years.
That's what the mixing cups required; they have used the primer a long time, so it was not done on purpose.
They called the jobber yesterday, and he was picking up the 5star and giving them the ppg cups.
Problem solved.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
One trick I use with mixing cups is the least critical part goes in the cup first. So if I’m mixing 4:1:1 primer I do the one part reducer first. My assumption is the first part added is the least accurate due to the shape of the bottom of the cup and placement of the graphics on the cup.

Don
On clears or single stage.
Three of us mix the product we just made for gel testing overnight.
I use the 1 through 10 big numbers on the cup, so if 4:1
Part a goes to 4 and activator to 5.
The leader of that department mixes the same with the beakers and as does one of the other guys.
In the last test, I was 320, and the leader was 322. The other guy was 340 something.
The 320 and 322 passed the spec, minutes, so good to go.
The angle you look at when adding can throw ratio off, and that is why I dont use the small bracket like, say, 4:1:1 just too small to read.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
The angle you look at when adding can throw ratio off, and that is why I dont use the small bracket like, say, 4:1:1 just too small to read.
I've always found that squatting down and viewing the cup at eye level works best. Looking down at the cup while standing is much less accurate. One reason why I never liked using a mixing stick in a metal can.
 

MP&C

Member
You have to be pretty sneaky about getting these out of the kitchen, but I find they’re pretty good at keeping ratios consistent. :p

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Wow I’ve never had this problem. Never even thought about it honestly. Seems like the cups would have to be wildly inaccurate to have that big of an effect on product.
 
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