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Thread: Epoxy and cold shop

  1. #11
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    I think 60-65 will work, metal temp is key and maybe 30 minutes in sun to raise the temp, can only help and allow a little extra flash time.
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  2. #12
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    I see "let it sit in the sun" a lot in these forums. In reality, only part of the project would be in the sun for part of the day. Say a typical garage has trees around it and the drive way only gets sun for a couple hours a day and only from one side. Now let's say I'm painting a car. I can roll it out in the drive and some of the roof and passenger side would get some sun. Would that mean the drivers side won't harden up? Rotating the car to get the sun all over it isn't an option for A lot of people.
    Does "sitting in the sun" help in other ways by letting the solvents escape from the rest of the car not hit by the sun?
    Thanks.
    Danford1
    Those who say it can't be done, should not interrupt those that are busy doing it...

  3. #13
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    I used it straight all winter long in an enclosed garage in the low to mid 60's with cure times about a day longer than normal. I know it's cured when it dusts when I sand... If it won't sand I wait a little longer.

  4. #14
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    I'm running into this issue now. Garage is about 65. Most of the metal is only reaching 55. Got the heat cranked all night. Well see how it goes. Its radiant heat so it takes a little longer sometimes.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by danford1 View Post
    I see "let it sit in the sun" a lot in these forums. In reality, only part of the project would be in the sun for part of the day. Say a typical garage has trees around it and the drive way only gets sun for a couple hours a day and only from one side. Now let's say I'm painting a car. I can roll it out in the drive and some of the roof and passenger side would get some sun. Would that mean the drivers side won't harden up? Rotating the car to get the sun all over it isn't an option for A lot of people.
    Does "sitting in the sun" help in other ways by letting the solvents escape from the rest of the car not hit by the sun?
    Thanks.
    Danford1
    You are right in your thinking about the sides but with most paint jobs the flat surfaces have a heavier build of paint and the sides usually case very few problems.
    Now fighting a cold garage for the do it at home people, if it is 50 degrees out and sunny, the bare metal will heat up to the 70's and higher real fast, then if gray epoxy is put back in the sun the metal may get in the 80's-90's to bake it off, black will get in the 90's or higher.
    Going back to a fresh paint job, a day or two in the sun before wet-sanding will really help a lot to level the paint.
    I have always believed one day in the sun is worth 7-10 days in a shop and I really believe the correct answer is more like 15-20 days, if full sun but just a theory on my end.
    Barry@kives.net
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  6. #16
    Member W.A.R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    You are right in your thinking about the sides but with most paint jobs the flat surfaces have a heavier build of paint and the sides usually case very few problems.
    Now fighting a cold garage for the do it at home people, if it is 50 degrees out and sunny, the bare metal will heat up to the 70's and higher real fast, then if gray epoxy is put back in the sun the metal may get in the 80's-90's to bake it off, black will get in the 90's or higher.
    Going back to a fresh paint job, a day or two in the sun before wet-sanding will really help a lot to level the paint.
    I have always believed one day in the sun is worth 7-10 days in a shop and I really believe the correct answer is more like 15-20 days, if full sun but just a theory on my end.
    So would the 24 hours at 70+ degrees not be required if set in the sun for a day?

  7. #17
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    I don't know of any shops around herw that keep their shops at 75 degrees constant during the winter.

    I sprayed some epoxy 3 days ago. Kept the garage at 70-72. I shot some g2 poly last night and I'm sanding now. Everythong seems ok. But damn is this stressful.

    I know my boss will not put our shop above 65. So metal temps are obviously lower. I have a heated booth but I can't run it for 24 hours. Lol.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I don't know of any shops around herw that keep their shops at 75 degrees constant during the winter.

    I sprayed some epoxy 3 days ago. Kept the garage at 70-72. I shot some g2 poly last night and I'm sanding now. Everythong seems ok. But damn is this stressful.

    I know my boss will not put our shop above 65. So metal temps are obviously lower. I have a heated booth but I can't run it for 24 hours. Lol.

  8. #18
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    This is just me, but I would just flat out not use epoxy in any conditions where the surface might fall below 60° for the first 7 days or so. You might get away with it a lot of times, but the one time you don't will leave you wishing you never had.

    Maybe this is why self-etch is still on the books at the majors... too many cold shops.

  9. #19
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    This will probably be the last time I use epoxy in the winter months at home. Its just too much stress. I rarely take stuff down to metal. The limited stuff I do I'll just spot in with etch. I love the epoxy in the summer months though!

  10. #20
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    Originally Posted by bmenard
    Well the shop has a furnace and I own two big salamanders, I guess I just don't understand how long the epoxy needs to be above a certain temp. The way it sounds is like it will all peel off if it isn't at 70 degrees for weeks or months after application. With all the dire warnings about cold, i am just a little apprehensive. If I knew to keep it at X temp for X long I could make it happen, as long as it wasn't weeks or something.

    Barry:
    Bring metal temp up to 70, shut off heat. Spray coat of epoxy and give 30 minutes flash, don't worry the temp is dropping at this time.
    When done and aired out, set heat to 70 (air) for 24 hours and you are good to go.
    Crash.....why do you leave it at 60° for 7 days?

    Can I spray epoxy and keep the metal 70° for 24 hours.......shut the heat down......let the shop get down to 40° for 5 days

    Come back and heat the shop back to 70° And spray high build because I'm in my 7 day window??

    You got me worried. I shut the heat off after 24 hours. I'm already in the blocking stage

    image by -glhxturbo-

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