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Dave C 5

Member
Before and after - didn’t want to take the trunk skin off and with all the structures in there I was limited to dolly work - used stud gun, slapper bar, hammer, shrinking disk and a bit of beer - got it to a 1/16 of an inch - maybe those darker pockets are 1/8 - calling it good !
 

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shine

Member
imho there is no substitute for lead . i learned it many years ago but like most moved into the world of polyester filler . i have never seen a polyester filler that would not map . vpa is the closest i've come up with . if i were to undertake another big project i would go back to lead . it's not really any harder than filler. just have to prep it right .
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
imho there is no substitute for lead . i learned it many years ago but like most moved into the world of polyester filler . i have never seen a polyester filler that would not map . vpa is the closest i've come up with . if i were to undertake another big project i would go back to lead . it's not really any harder than filler. just have to prep it right .
What I've been saying this whole thread.
 

123pugsy

Member
Before and after - didn’t want to take the trunk skin off and with all the structures in there I was limited to dolly work - used stud gun, slapper bar, hammer, shrinking disk and a bit of beer - got it to a 1/16 of an inch - maybe those darker pockets are 1/8 - calling it good !

I cool my metal with plain old water when using the shrinking disc, but I like your style........
 

chevman

Oldtimer
My experience with lead has lead me to use it only at-or near-the edge of a panel, or a factory seam. Using it away from the edge or seam, is just too much heat, and leaving you always needing to add a little more lead because of shrinkage in the metal beyond the end of the leaded area, like a dog chasing his tail. The extent of that depends on the crown of the panel, of course.

I tried lead on the filler panel between the trunk lid and back window of a mustang a couple of decades ago, to get the seam level, but it got too hot and it ended up lower than before. Had to remove and replace the panel, but when doing a different mustang recently with the same problem, I just used a jack to raise it up to level. Over time it might drop again, so I'm thinking it may need a little support to be sure it stays in alignment.

The point being that lead is easy if you know the pit falls, such as cleanliness, proper tinning, and correct amount of heat, to name a few. There is a learning curve for sure, and utube is not the place to learn about lead. I have the video that Chris mentioned, and it is good. Here is another one that I like even better.
https://www.tinmantech.com/products/dvds/autobody/The-Art-and-Science-of-Autobody-Soldering.php
 
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El Toro

Member
Growing up in my uncle Nick's euuropean body shop i did learn to use lead but on it's way out. Have not used lead in 40 years would make a big mess LoL
 
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