New orbital sander

MP&C

Member
We’ve been working on stainless trim lately and we use 6” Trizact to prep before polishing. As pricey as the Trizact is, I thought perhaps a 5” sander would work well and we could trim off the edges of those pads when the edge starts to wear and thus get more life out of them. Looking online and I didn’t recognize most of the vendors, heck, let me look at McMaster Carr. They typically don’t identify brand names but the detail pictures they showed of the sanders looked exactly like the Dynabrade, so I rolled the dice. Ordered yesterday afternoon, delivered today just after lunch.

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ksungela

Member
Looks perfect. I can polish SS to a 9.5 out of 10 but there are always those fine micro scratches left. What was your wheel process? Sewn cotton? then what type of compound if I may ask?
 
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MJM

Promoted Users
We used Trizact 1500 through 8000 to get rid of the micro scratches in the stainless and then hit the buffing wheel.



Did you use the new sander for each Trzact grit 1500 thru 8000?.........and do you use a cheater valve on the sander to adjust rpms?
 

MP&C

Member
3600 rpm on the buffer. Wheel on the left is sewn, use the green compound on this one. After 8000 grit Trizact most of the coarser compounds are far too aggressive and would put scratches back in. Wheel on the right is loose. Compound looks light grey to me but perhaps it is supposed to be white. I have a bunch of different compounds here that I got second hand, so a crap shoot. We polished up a scrap and then tried different compounds, looking for what polished up without leaving scratches from being too coarse. The light grey/white won out.

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Did not get a cheater valve with the new sander, you do have to keep things damp or the Trizact will burn up. But the higher RPM’s tend to get things done faster. ;) It is pretty quiet though…
 
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