Overthinking

50Shep

Promoted Users

Evil_Fiz

Promoted Users
Thanks, guys for the info. I will look into Durablocls and acrylic as well. Is there a Durablock kit that makes more sense than others? Any recommendations on acrylic block vendors or should I DIY the acrylic?

You can get a car straight with nothing more than a paint stick or two taped together. But not the best choice. Durablocks will work well. Acrylic in varying thicknesses would probably be the most foolproof method as they conform to a panel without deformation of the block itself.

Just as important would be technique. When you are blocking to correct you want to cross hatch. Meaning draw an imaginary horizontal line through the panel and sand 45 degrees to that line across the panel. Then go back across the panel at the opposite 45 degree angle. You have to sand the entire panel even if you are just trying to remove one low spot. That is the key to this.
You only sand in one direction in limited situations like color sanding or your final wet sand.
One of the most valuable lessons I have learned from this site is not to spot sand and to let the paper and block do the work. I have so much to learn but visiting this site daily is time well spent.

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Emil

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Emil
 

dhutton01

Promoted Users
When bending the round durablock the sand paper bunches up. Or if I leave the paper flat I can’t hold onto the paper. I’m sure there’s away to do this but I’m having trouble…
It’s not intended for sanding profiles that way. It’s for long straight curves, if that makes sense.

Curves like these.
6A6E463A-ABDB-4E69-83C5-D49C0A92895C.jpeg


For compound curves I usually use a soft foam block. Again, many opinions on this…

Post up a pic of the area you are trying to sand.

Don
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Years ago I saw a guy "block" out a 70's Corvette with a soft hand block. No more than 5" or 6". Looked good when he finished. I'm not endorsing this, but the point is a curved surface is much harder to see a wave in than a flat panel.
 
When bending the round durablock the sand paper bunches up. Or if I leave the paper flat I can’t hold onto the paper. I’m sure there’s away to do this but I’m having trouble…
The round block will only take a slight bend but that is not really how to use it. As Chris stated you are sanding in a crosshatch manner and the round block reduces the contact area so that you can sand through the curved area still making contact with the metal.

The same applies to the Tear Drop shaped block. It gives you a better hand hold on the block while the smaller section is traversing the concave areas on the panel.
 

50Shep

Promoted Users
The round block will only take a slight bend but that is not really how to use it. As Chris stated you are sanding in a crosshatch manner and the round block reduces the contact area so that you can sand through the curved area still making contact with the metal.

The same applies to the Tear Drop shaped block. It gives you a better hand hold on the block while the smaller section is traversing the concave areas on the panel.
Thank you. After I wrote that I was looking at the round block and realized it’s probably not meant to bend much. I’m sanding roundy fenders on a 1950 Chevy truck.
7AD1D0B1-4979-4722-9818-690BE2CAB7F5.jpeg
273506B4-5CA5-45FF-98A4-FF41B1030A52.jpeg
 

50Shep

Promoted Users
It’s not intended for sanding profiles that way. It’s for long straight curves, if that makes sense.

Curves like these.
View attachment 19154

For compound curves I usually use a soft foam block. Again, many opinions on this…

Post up a pic of the area you are trying to sand.

Don
Wow! Nice. If this just your hobby, I want to come live next door to you so you can help me an I can borrow your booth!
 

Lizer

Mad Scientist
Thanks, guys for the info. I will look into Durablocls and acrylic as well. Is there a Durablock kit that makes more sense than others? Any recommendations on acrylic block vendors or should I DIY the acrylic?


One of the most valuable lessons I have learned from this site is not to spot sand and to let the paper and block do the work. I have so much to learn but visiting this site daily is time well spent.

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Emil

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Emil
There is a Durablock kit that has two long blocks, a short block, and short 'pad,' and a round block about 12" long or so. That kit is pretty versatile and you can do a lot with it. That's what I would suggest for your application.

You can also get creative with making your own blocks. A 12" round block is too long when you're trying to sand a wheel opening or something that has a slight flare or contour to it. For this I use a piece of 3/4" diameter plastic conduit about 6" long, I wrap an old used up 3M trizact pad around it to act as an interface pad, and then I wrap my sand paper around that.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Member theastronaut has some pics of acrylic blocks that he made. Do a search of his posts if you want to see what I'm talking about.
 

Dean Jenkins

Promoted Users
I'm probably going to get a set from True Blox before my next project. https://www.trueblox.com/ they look good, the price seems reasonable and I like the variety of kits available.
Way more reasonable than the "Linear Blocking Guy" who wants ~$200 for 1 block.
 
Thank you. After I wrote that I was looking at the round block and realized it’s probably not meant to bend much. I’m sanding roundy fenders on a 1950 Chevy truck. View attachment 19161View attachment 19162
Looking at the sanding marks in the picture tells me you are not sanding in a cross hatch like you should be.
Force yourself to learn to sand at a 45 degree angle from one end to the other, then reverse direction so that you are sanding in the opposite 45 degree angle and creating a X style pattern.

There should be no areas that haven't been sanded.
 

texasking

Promoted Users
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50Shep

Promoted Users
When I spray my reduced epoxy 1:1:1, I notice it is not shiny. Kind of silvery/matte color. Is that right or am I not spraying it correctly?
 
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