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1980 z28

#1
When this first came in we thought we could do a quick paint job, update the suspension and brakes make it a roller so the customer could install a GM crate engine. The owner bought it sight unseen but had it inspected. At first it looked great.



We removed the rear bumper and found this.





Cut out the first layer of rust













 
#7
One of the first things we did was install Global West subframe connectors







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Barry;33811 said:
I bet Brian is having a fit working on a chevy. LOL
He's not that excited about working on a foreign car but when you have a good customer sometimes you have to look the other way!!
 
#8
Man, you got it easy (and cheap), working on a Chevy. Here's what I got working on a Firebird:



The rear tail panel for a firebird is a lot more expensive than for a Camaro (and different)


I feel your pain lol
 
#10
Another common failure spot is where the trunk hinges attach-check for stress cracks. I had a 79 that I put a 71 RS front clip on many years ago. Subframe connectors are a must with them cars and even then if you jack from the wrong spot the doors won't open. Hope he didn't pay for the inspection.
 
#11
These were great looking cars, but rusty beasts. Never actually weighed a complete door on one but replaced a few. Talk about hinge strain - heavy doors. I never drove in one that didnt rattle - my sister had a new 78 Firebird Formula, beautiful car bur rattled and creaked from day one. I think they started rusting on day 1 too.
 
#13
Very nice work. I really enjoy your work. I'm amazed at that window channel. By the pics I cant even tell its been replaced. Glad to see you guys working on a 2nd gen Camaro. I have an 81 awaiting restoration when I finish my 72.
 
#14
Rusty, can you give us rookies any pointers on how Brian get the weld seam to disappear like that. I usually have a solid welded seam, but still have highs and lows in the metal from the weld seam itself. Sometimes if I keep grinding, I'm afraid it will weaken the surrounding metal. Thanks for any advice. I hope to be able to do work like this some day.
 
#15
rustover;33871 said:
Rusty, can you give us rookies any pointers on how Brian get the weld seam to disappear like that. I usually have a solid welded seam, but still have highs and lows in the metal from the weld seam itself. Sometimes if I keep grinding, I'm afraid it will weaken the surrounding metal. Thanks for any advice. I hope to be able to do work like this some day.
I don't know how he does it he amazes me every time I see it. He says a lot has to do with how its welded. He starts with a 3" 50 grit disc on an angle grinder and cuts it smaller where needed.
 
#16
The owner ordered a DSE roll bar made for a 1980 Camaro.



Sanded and epoxy primed









Before installing the roll bar we had to patch a few small holes in the floor and sand followed by a couple coats of epoxy









 
#18
Rusty, Looking good! Question - on that floor pan, did you grind the rusted areas and scuff the white areas where the floors were in good shape - then epoxy? Your work and attention to detail is outstanding!
 
#19
6686mustang;33913 said:
Rusty, Looking good! Question - on that floor pan, did you grind the rusted areas and scuff the white areas where the floors were in good shape - then epoxy? Your work and attention to detail is outstanding!
We cut out and patched the rusted areas than sanded the rest.
 
#20
The right fender had rust in the brace plus a small spot on the fender. This is what it looked like under the brace.













The left fender did not have any rust showing but the owner wanted it taken apart and epoxy primed also.










 
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