Another "how do I fix this"

grogetter

Member
Question about blending over spray.
Since I'll be blending the base coat on a horizontal surface, I anticipate a lot of dry over spray on the rest of the hood. How do I deal with this prior to clearing?
thanks
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Question about blending over spray.
Since I'll be blending the base coat on a horizontal surface, I anticipate a lot of dry over spray on the rest of the hood. How do I deal with this prior to clearing?
thanks
Excessive overspray should not be an issue. If you have lots of overspray you need to adjust your gun correctly and your air pressure. You should tack between coats of base though, to remove any oversoray that may be on the surface.
What gun are using for the basecoat? One of us here can more than likely give you settings to start with.
Also make sure you use a high quality reducer. Preferably SPI reducer. Slow or very slow. Low quality reducer will result in dry rough overspray outside the blend area. High quality reducer solves that. Remember too, do not use fast or medium reducer. Only slow or very slow. (SPI 885 or 895)
 

grogetter

Member
I'm using a DeVilbis Finish Line, not a 2, 3 or 4, but the original FLG with a #3 HVLP air cap and a 1.3 tip and I'm spraying at 22 psi with the trigger pulled. DeVilbis states that 23psi is the maximum but 22 seems to work best. For the last coat of base I've reduced the pressure to 18 and pulled the gun back. I'm also using it for clear.
Tomorrow, I'll check the reducer that the paint jobber gave me with the Wanda base and let you know what it is. It's not SPI
 

AAE

Learner
I'm using a DeVilbis Finish Line, not a 2, 3 or 4, but the original FLG with a #3 HVLP air cap and a 1.3 tip and I'm spraying at 22 psi with the trigger pulled. DeVilbis states that 23psi is the maximum but 22 seems to work best. For the last coat of base I've reduced the pressure to 18 and pulled the gun back. I'm also using it for clear.
Tomorrow, I'll check the reducer that the paint jobber gave me with the Wanda base and let you know what it is. It's not SPI
The 23psi is just to get the 10psi at the air cap that's required by the EPA. You can go higher to meet your spraying style. Most people do bump it up several pounds.
 

grogetter

Member
The paint supplier sold me Collision Pro reducer and I have used it in all the base I've applied to the car.
I also have SPI Urethane Reducer.
AAE. Thanks for that information. I did not know that. I'll have to try that when I spray the clear.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
The paint supplier sold me Collision Pro reducer and I have used it in all the base I've applied to the car.
I also have SPI Urethane Reducer.
AAE. Thanks for that information. I did not know that. I'll have to try that when I spray the clear.
Use the SPI all that other stuff is good for is cleaning your gun. It's the low end stuff that I hate and causes people issues. You will notice a difference I promise.
 

grogetter

Member
This can of worms just will not give up.
Last Monday afternoon, I sprayed epoxy primer on this spot as sealer waited 2 hours then sprayed base over it. However, it was obvious that the filler was not done correctly so I wet sanded the filler down like it should be, used waterborn wax and grease remover followed by solvent wax and grease remover. Waited 30 minutes (shop temperature in the 90s) shot the sealer and you see what happened in the photos so I wiped it all off, along with all of the base that I had applied, using urethane reducer and called it a day, figuring that I hadn't allowed enough time for the W&G remover to dry. Today I sprayed the epoxy sealer and got the same result. What the hell?
I know that I'll have to sand the filler off and start again because the filler is obviously contaminated but anyone have an idea as to what happened.?
Just a little info, the filler where this occurs just doesn't feel smooth like it should even after wet sanding with 800.
IMG_2501.jpg
IMG_2502.jpg
 

crashtech

Combo Man
I'm confused about sanding filler wet. Filler is porous and will absorb water, so if it gets wet, it has to dry for a long time before primer. But even if the filler is not wet, it's totally normal for the filled area to look different because it will absorb solvent from the primer. It's not really advisable to try to seal and paint directly over bare filler for this reason. Filler must be primed and sanded before sealing and painting.

It's really hard to tell from the photos, but if that is bare filler with a coat of epoxy over it, it may not be anything alarming, it just appears to show the different solvent absorption rate of the various materials you are primering over.
 
yes could be what crashtech says...and yes filler has a lot of talc in it and soaks up water...i think i would sand that down smooth in that area before digging out filler (unless you really think it didnt cure correctly). and apply a couple coats of unreduced epoxy over any bare filler let it cure ..block it smooth and if you didnt break thru any metal or filler spray base....and i would also give about an hour for w&g remover to dry in high humidity....and another thing when sanding off that rough textured area...i would put it in the sun a bit so if theres any moisture left in the filler it will dry out.. there may be some better advice on it coming so hang in there!
 

grogetter

Member
After taking these photos today I wiped it all off with urethane reducer instead of letting it cure and then having to sand it off.
Water and solvent trapped in the filler makes the most sense. It looked just like the epoxy was beading up on the surface of the filler.
 
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