Halo Trim R & R

Klleetrucking

Promoted Users
Wasn't real sure where to post this but here goes.
The car is a 1970 Cutlass Supreme with a vinyl top. Of course the vinyl needs replacing, the roof skin appears to be in good shape but if not, the question is moot.
The trim I'm referring to is a "divider" between the the vinyl top and the painted area between the drip rail. The trim is pristine, btw.
Would a hobbyist (me) even considering trying to remove this trim and reinstalling it? I've searched for info on how to do this but haven't had much luck.
A friend that does Chevelle's said "NO, you tape it off and work up to it as best you can.", "You realize it's made from unobtainium."
I can post pics later if that would help.
Thanks.
 

dhutton01

Promoted Users
They are die cast moldings with cast in studs used with thread cutting nuts. I would remove them after applying Kroil to the studs. These parts are reproduced and also available used on eBay....

You can’t do a proper job working around those moldings imho....

Don
 

Klleetrucking

Promoted Users
Here's the trim I'm concerned about.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20201110_133009.jpg
    IMG_20201110_133009.jpg
    127.5 KB · Views: 27
  • IMG_20201110_133107.jpg
    IMG_20201110_133107.jpg
    147.6 KB · Views: 23
  • IMG_20201110_133142.jpg
    IMG_20201110_133142.jpg
    135.5 KB · Views: 21

Klleetrucking

Promoted Users
They are die cast moldings with cast in studs used with thread cutting nuts. I would remove them after applying Kroil to the studs. These parts are reproduced and also available used on eBay....

You can’t do a proper job working around those moldings imho....

Don
Thanks Don.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
General tip with trim is be patient, always go slow, and never force anything. The mini pick and hook sets that you can buy are IMO indispensable for work that we do. Great for gentle prying especially when trying to figure out how something comes off. That and plastic pry tools are great to have when doing any trim removal. Good sharp, thin, extra flexible putty knife is another good tool to have for working with trim like that.

I would remove them after applying Kroil to the studs.

Googled it as I've never heard of it. Looks like good stuff. Going to order some and try it out. Thanks Don.
 

Carshinebob

Promoted Users
I know a little bit about these cars. The rear corners are attached by a wire nut accessible form inside the trunk. the stainless sections are attached by nylon snap clips just carefully unsnap them. As you slide the stainless off from the potmetal pieces you will find scews holding the potmetal corners under the stainless. Best of luck. ~BOB
 

Sparky

Promoted Users
General tip with trim is be patient, always go slow, and never force anything. The mini pick and hook sets that you can buy are IMO indispensable for work that we do. Great for gentle prying especially when trying to figure out how something comes off. That and plastic pry tools are great to have when doing any trim removal. Good sharp, thin, extra flexible putty knife is another good tool to have for working with trim like that.



Googled it as I've never heard of it. Looks like good stuff. Going to order some and try it out. Thanks Don.
I found Kroil 2 years ago, its expensive, but like no other penetrating oil I've ever used. Great stuff on rusted fasteners.
 

Klleetrucking

Promoted Users
Thanks Don and Bob.
I did find the studs attaching the lower corner (drv. side) and loosened them up and the trim is loose in that particular corner. With a flashlight I can see the screws under the sail panel area that I assume are holding the clips in place. I then stopped because I'm getting ahead of myself and this will be a project in and of itself. It would appear there's a sequence in which the trim comes off. I'm going to try to find a picture of the clips and study it to determine the best approach.
It'll be a bit before I get back to this part of the teardown as I have the dash out for installation of the Vintage Air among other things. I'm not a good multi tasker.

Thanks again for the help!
 
Last edited:

Klleetrucking

Promoted Users
A big thank you for everyone's help. Especially Don and Bob for the tip on the back corner studs. Once I figured out the sequence of assembly it went fairly smooth. As Chris pointed out patience was a key.
Thanks again, K. Lee
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20201121_153420471.jpg
    IMG_20201121_153420471.jpg
    172.4 KB · Views: 11
  • IMG_20201121_153443368.jpg
    IMG_20201121_153443368.jpg
    118.2 KB · Views: 10
Top