Orange peel in Euro

texasking

Active Member
I have 2 new Fords to repair that have been hail damaged. The last one I did, I painted a new hood and both roof rails. The texture on the vehicle was horrible and mine was much smoother, mixed 4:1:1. I've thought about less reduction, less pressure, more or less fluid, more flash time between coats, less overlap, and gun farther away. Anyone have a suggestion as to the best way to increase texture?
 
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jlcustomz

evil painter
Glad I don't do collision work. Sucks to make your paint suck to match. If by any chance you could talk customers into budgeting in a little improvement work, a light hit with the new 3000/ 8000 trizact & quick buff on adjacent existing panels could give a little improvement to rest of paint without too much removal.
Honestly I still haven't got to try my new 3M stuff yet, but years ago I used Festool 2000 & 4000 grit wet mesh pads to give an improvement on factory paints without too much removal. Wife's personal black car she kept for 14 years was my first test & monitoring of effect. No burn throughs then (about 1 year into new 02' 300M) or in future maintenance buffing. Yea, different system, but reasonably quick improvement in factory paint .

Just a thought????
 
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Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
I've substituted guns in the past with better sucess than trying to alter my spraying. For that job I would use my Sata 2000 HVLP instead of the RP. I could usually get it close like that. If that isn't an option then fluid reduction would be the first thing I'd try. Do everything the same just lessen the fluid.
BTW the finish on "modern" vehicles is atrocious. Fords are some of the worst offenders.
 

texasking

Active Member
These are so rough in places (top of doors and tailgates) that it looks like they sprayed over bedliner. I worked at a Ford dealership in the late '90's, early 2000's, and they were rough then, but they are even worse now. The fit and finish is just awful.
 

sprint_9

Rookie
I just got a new F-150 and it is pretty bad, especially when sitting next to my C10. Sitting next to a year old Chevy its comparable I guess.

I agree in lessening the fluid is the way to go. Probably a 1/4 to 1/2 turn. The other thing would be either speeding up or less overlap. I have orange peel and put it down to speed and overlap as my issues. Just up and changing how you spray is alot harder than turning a knob though.
 

texasking

Active Member
For some reason, the F250 and 350's are quite a bit worse than the F150's, in fit and finish. Been that way a long time. Thanks for the advice. I think an HVLP would work without changing how I normally spray, as would cutting the fluid back. I think I will take my own advice and try to spray the first coat how I want it to look, (dry and rough), then give it an extended flash time before the following coat.
 
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Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Factory 2014 F-150 (white) we had in the shop years ago was one of the worst peel jobs I've ever seen. Sitting up on the frame machine highlighted all the peel down the side of it. Now it's crap paint and aluminum bodies that you can't repair without totaling them. One of the biggest salvage yards on the East Coast (Cunningham Brothers) is about 60 miles from where I live and you should see the aluminum F150's all lined up in rows that would never have been totaled if they were steel bodies. Dozens upon dozens of them. They would make good candidates for resto-modding an old Ford truck with the modern drivetrain frame and suspension.
 

Raymond_B

Hobbyist
I have a black 2019 F-150 and I did notice the orange peel is pretty bad.

Yeah everyone is swapping in Coyotes, I bet that salvage yard is booming.
 

texasking

Active Member
The hail damage is a big problem, also. My PDR guy that I use hates them, and I'm not spending the money on tools it takes to fix them, either. One of my customers that gets a new one every few years, said his insurance went way up on the first aluminum bodied truck he bought.
 

serjik911

Active Member
Great thread. Just took a photo how to do not do the job. Front door I painted with euro spi, rear door is factory. I was rushing and no one cares, but I do .
IMG_20200603_153443.jpg

Screenshot_20200603-220255.png
 
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serjik911

Active Member
TK, please keep updated thread how did you do the bigger orange peel.
usually what i do is decrease the pressure a bit and increase distance between gun and part
 

jcclark

Oldtimer
I always try to match the existing finish on all my repairs,
It's easy to get it to slick.
I sometimes have to buff the existing panel beside my new one to try and help it look the same.
I think I'd rather fix a car with a great finish than a bad one, it's easier to match.
But in all my collision repair, which is mainly only a panel or two, I try not to
color sand much to match what's there. And here lately I am not buffing at all to let it match.
 
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