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Single Stage Over Epoxy Window

#1
I know the recommend window to put down a single stage over epoxy without sanding is seven days. The outside temperature is already pretty cool where I live and I had to turn the heat on in my garage to insure the temp stayed above 65 degrees while my epoxy cured. I'm wondering if the cool temps allow an extension of the seven day window before applying a single stage without sanding - like eleven days? I'd just like to shoot the engine bay, door jambs, underside of hood and trunk. Those areas that would be difficult to sand.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#4
I know the recommend window to put down color over epoxy without sanding is seven days. The outside temperature is already pretty cool where I live and I had to turn the heat on in my garage to insure the temp stayed above 65 degrees while my epoxy cured. I'm wondering if the cool temps allow an extension of the seven day window before applying a two stage color without sanding - like eleven days? I want to shoot the engine bay, door jambs, underside of hood, and trunk. Those areas that would be difficult to sand.
___________
Joe, could it work for areas inside the car like a trunk, engine compartment? Yes, could it come apart? Yes.
Gambling with nature is very risky for painting.
There is no answer sad to say as too many factors involved.
 

Slofut

Active Member
#6
Would it not be best after 7 days to scotchbrite and seal with a piss coat 30 min before paint? Btw... Id rather do overalls on two cars than have to sand an engine compartment! Not to mention sanding to fix if something went wrong.
 
#7
Ok, I'm not going to try to paint without sanding the engine bay first. When you say hit it with a Scotchbrite pad how much sanding are you talking about? I mean, are you actually talking about sanding to the point of creating powder and completely knocking down the sheen?
 

Slofut

Active Member
#8
Well, you don't want to rub through to metal if you can help it, but other than that yes, rub it down well and knock the sheen off. Where it's glossy paint won't stick. Scotchbrite is easier than paper...
 
#9
Sanding sponges can be a nice compromise between scuff pads and sandpaper. They level texture better than scuff pads but are also very conformable. I think they are best for things like body color engine compartments that have to be smooth but not necessarily straight.
 

Slofut

Active Member
#12
Ok Crash, those are completely different that the hardware store variation. I would not recommend the hardware store type on automotive finishing stages. I haven't seen the autobody type, I must be living under a rock. Thanks for the link.
 
#13
Actually, I'm using my own variation of the Norton product. I had some fairly dense foam pads about 1/2" thick and I cut a 6" long rectangle the width of a strip of 320 grit, adhesive backed sandpaper and it's working very well - much easier than the Scotchbrite pad. It's not as flexible as I think the Norton pads would be, so, I have to still use the Scotchbrite pads in some areas.

Thanks everyone.
 
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