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Soft Edge

#1
I did not find a previous post on this subject, so I have a question. When you want a "soft edge" for primer, you flip the edge of the tape so the back side is stuck to itself about 1/4" on a 3/4" roll. Then when you spray to that tape line, you get a soft edge as long as you dont load it up under the rolled up edge. Is this correct? Im looking for an easier way than having to feather the edge of the primer edge after the tape is removed.
 
#2
In my limited experience, yes it's a good idea to roll back the tape to avoid a hard line. But I have always had better luck with just prepping the panel way outside of where the primer edge will end and this way you have plenty of room to feather your primer edge and not
worry about a tape line at all. Even with the tape rolled back is possible to build too much primer on the edge and then it's a bit of a bother to feather it out. I have no idea what panels you are shooting and realize that sometimes there is just very little room to do what I suggested.
 
#3
We never tape close to a primer spot. We sand a minimum of 8-10" farther away than the repair area, and tape at that perimeter. The only thing that should hit the tape line is overspray. If you prime up to a line, even if it is a soft edge, you will introduce an imperfection that will look like a wave. The only time a soft edge for primer makes sense is along sharp body line.
 
#5
Bob Hollinshead;40615 said:
instead of just rolling the edge of the tape just roll the whole piece of masking paper back
Exactly, when room is limited just stick the masking paper on with the paper pointing toward the repair, and flip it back. This makes the tape have a rolled radius. Honestly this should not be required very often!
 
#6
crashtech;40621 said:
Exactly, when room is limited just stick the masking paper on with the paper pointing toward the repair, and flip it back. This makes the tape have a rolled radius. Honestly this should not be required very often!
I agree, once a person develops good gun control it's usually not needed but if you're worried about overspraying something it works.
 
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