Trim repair when OEM no longer available?

rlboinski

New Member
I’m working on painting my 300ZX and have learned so much from these forums, but one thing I have not seen it what is the preferred way to refinish/repair trim and mouldings when OEM parts are not available in some cases and VERY expensive in others? Do people remove them and send them out to a specialist that can recoat them in a similar material to OEM, or is there a sprayable product that can get similar results? I’ve been trying to piece a full set together through part outs but it just isn’t happening. I’m not concerned if the finish is a bit different than OEM, but I would like something aesthetically pleasing and consistent. Thanks!
 
I think it depends upon what the trim is made of.
The older classic cars I work on had stainless steel trim in most cases and it can be straightened, sanded and buffed.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Since you mentioned a 300ZX, I'm assuming most of the trim you are talking about is blacked out. Some of it is plastic, some of it stainless with a black finish applied. Good news is that yes it can be recoated. Procedures will vary depending on plastic or metal but you can refinish all of it to a high level.

Stainless will work best if you get some good 180 grit scratches in it and then apply epoxy. After the epoxy you can use a matte black like SPI's for final finish.
Plastics depending on the type can require an adhesion promoter. Some do, some don't. Simple test is to take a sliver of material that you are working on and put it in a glass of water, if it floats you need adhesion promoter, if it doesn't you don't. Use epoxy for your base irregardless. Then proceed with a matte black for your final finish.
That's just a brief generalized overview, if you have questions about specific parts just ask.
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
For interior trim you can get a rattle can texture coating such as from SEM if needed . Can also use epoxy for a base helping to cover worn interior plastics & improving bond of colorcoats.
 
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