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Using Kitty or Tiger Hair to Fill/Bridge Cancered Area ??????

#1
I have the below 73 Camaro Fender that has been sandblasted and SPI epoxy primed.

I DO NOT want to cut out and patch weld new metal

I want to use Evercoat Kitty or Tiger Hair....
Can I apply Tiger hair to both sides (where possible) of
of holes and expect material to hold up where holes
were bridged? I would finish with Rage or ????

This is for MY own one specific car. Not a customer nor
not my normal standard of restoration

Thanks, Chuck Sharin Auburn,WA
(Looking for a painter for my resto work)







20190101_121751.jpg
 
#3
Metalman, Not asking if you would do this ..........but am asking if members with experience
"think" the TigerHair would be an acceptable solution to my issue....A solution that would
be permanent.....
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#4
Used the way you are describing Chuck it is never a "permanent" solution. It is simply a quick way to cover up existing rust. How long will it last? Who knows? Could be 6 weeks, 6 months or longer, but sooner or later it will begin to bubble the topcoat. Only permanent solution is cutting out the rust and using new metal.
 
#5
Metalman, Not asking if you would do this ..........but am asking if members with experience
"think" the TigerHair would be an acceptable solution to my issue....A solution that would
be permanent.....
I did not say one way or another how I would do it.

You said: "I DO NOT want to cut out and patch weld new metal"
You Said: "I want to use Evercoat Kitty or Tiger Hair"
You asked for "...A solution that would be permanent"

I would feel bad for the next guy that owns "your car".
 
#6
........not my normal standard of restoration

..........Looking for a painter for my resto work

Why cut corners now? You're looking at about $10 to $20 of sheet metal to fix that properly BEFORE the paint goes on. Why not use this as a testament to your "normal standard" and fix it proper.

Unfortunately, MOST painters worth having wouldn't touch that as it will be a temporary repair, and will give them a bad name when the rust returns in a year or so..
 
#10
Hopefully we are not being trolled but if OP is sincere, I am going to offer my opinion after saying I agree this is not an acceptable repair in this day and time.

With that said Tigerhair is a polyester resin and not very strong. If, and only if, you can get to the back side of this panel to coat it and seal both sides you can mix Epoxy cement and woven fiberglass cloth cut on a diaganal. That will give you 1/4 - 3/8" strands. Add that to your mixed epoxy cement until you have a paste that will be thick enough to stay in place. Once cured grind it smooth and finish with a thin wipe of body filler.

In 1972 I built my first ground up "restoration"??? I was a 27 year old kid and basically owned a ballpeen hammer and a pair of channel locks. I mated a 41 Ford body with the convertible after sandblasting all panels. The bodies were joined about 8" up the quarter panel.

The friend I sold it to in 1992 finally had the car taken down and redone 3-4 years ago. It lasted 40 years but only because I had both sides of the panels clean and sealed from future moisture. LOL, Jim even brought me back some of my Stainless steel rivets in a zip lock bag. :)

Maybe I invented panel adhesive without knowing it. :)

John
 
Last edited:

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#12
Just to throw out cor another option.
Around 1980 I did a 70 Trans am and at the time for the life of me could not get a new fender.
So I wanted the shape to be perfect and where the problem was, I was concerned about cutting and welding, I knew I could do it perfect but worried i might change the contour without making a cake with filler. So with 4 coats of epoxy on both sides I took Duramix the next day and with a spreader wiped the back side as hard as I could. Then after it set up in 60 mins I did the same to front side. Next day sanded smooth and 2 more coats epoxy, next day a minor coat of glazing putty (Icing) saw the car at a show 4-6 years ago and still was perfect. The duramix was the general purpose adhesive. In all fairness the value of this car its not driven much.
 
#13
One key to making a successful repair is to obtain access to the entire backside of the repair, which really can't be done in that area because of the fender brace. So the glass reinforced filler will be exposed to air and water in the area hidden by the brace, which will (despite its being advertised as waterproof) cause the filler to fail prematurely.

But, if 100% access to the backside of the panel (in a different area, for example) can be had for proper corrosion protection, there would be no reason why a filler repair of that nature couldn't be considered "permanent," at least lasting the life of the paint job.

Since getting 100% access to the backside of that area requires drilling out spot welds, at that point there would be little reason to fudge the repair since welding will have to be done anyway to re-assemble the brace to the fender.

Short answer: No.
 
#14
Chuck is a troll. Anybody else remember his post looking for someone to take on his project for a cheep set rate? I do. Metalman's reply was spot on and the way I read Chucks reply would appear to be on the smart ass side.

For your information Chuck, even a 10th grade VoTech kid would know filling rust holes with putty is no where near as permanent as welding in a new piece of metal.
 
#15
Just to throw out cor another option.
Around 1980 I did a 70 Trans am and at the time for the life of me could not get a new fender.
So I wanted the shape to be perfect and where the problem was, I was concerned about cutting and welding, I knew I could do it perfect but worried i might change the contour without making a cake with filler. So with 4 coats of epoxy on both sides I took Duramix the next day and with a spreader wiped the back side as hard as I could. Then after it set up in 60 mins I did the same to front side. Next day sanded smooth and 2 more coats epoxy, next day a minor coat of glazing putty (Icing) saw the car at a show 4-6 years ago and still was perfect. The duramix was the general purpose adhesive. In all fairness the value of this car its not driven much.
The holes might close up with 6 coats of epoxy and then its just some spot putty.
 
#18
Just as common sense is becoming extinct, its hard to watch people who want to try to do a repair get shamed into learning. Best case is for him to make a big mistake and try again.

I have been tearing off repairs from my 66 Chevelle that I did in 1982 when I was 16-17. Aluminum since it was easier to cut, rivets, bondo. I peel off a 1/4 inch of bondo from the sail panel area and there is writing on it like silly putty. Thats what I had, drill bits, hand shears, and why wouldnt you want to use aluminum flashing that wont rust? For the life of me I dont know where this lettering came from.

Now I get to fix it right by dumping some 6000 into replacement panels and I am sure I will be called out for using jap crap. I did buy two shermer pieces, no ecoat, neither of them fit. The filler panel at the back window was 3" too wide and the shape for the trunk area had the wrong radius.
 
#20
I am honestly wondering if this guy isn't actually a troll, but the kind of person who just doesn't have a lot of awareness of how his words and actions affect others. I'm not in favor of banning him, I think these threads actually have value in their own way.
 
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