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Which comes first? Inside or out?

#1
I'm planning out the process of of painting my 57 Chevy pickup. Inside is going to be an ivory color sprayed in Wanda BC / Universal clear. I want to do the exterior in SPI single stage black. Jambs will be body color (black), like the attached photo.

Which comes first? Inside bc/cc, then tape it off and spray up to it with the single stage? Or spray exterior and jambs black and tape, then spray inside? I'm trying to minimize and/or blend tape lines.

Will it be a mistake to try this with single stage and bc/cc? Should I switch to bc/cc for the outside? Thanks.
 

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#4
Spraying top down probably makes sense in a good down draft booth but painting in a standard booth or garage, II always shoot bottom up beginning the farthest away from the exhaust fan. The logic is, the overspray will settle in the non sprayed surface and be melted in when the panel is sprayed. Otherwise, you will have over spray you don't want settle on your fresh paint.

John
 
#6
That is another question I was going to ask. Chris, the way I read it, that is also what John is saying. So far, I have only sprayed epoxy. In my mind it was working better to let the overspray land in wet paint and melt in. Maybe I'm wrong. Last month I tried to spray 2 doors, 2 fenders, and a hood all at once. The un-sprayed stuff was totally covered in overspray by the time I got to it. I lightly used a tack cloth to dust off each part before spraying.
 
#8
MX442, Chris and I are both saying the same thing.

'68 Coronet, Everybody does not have a great place to paint. Proper air flow is a great thing and a professional could not live without it. Unfortunately, many of us who do this as a hobby have to make do with facilities that are less than ideal. When that is the case, we need to work smart to obtain the best results possible.

John
 
#9
MX442, Chris and I are both saying the same thing.

'68 Coronet, Everybody does not have a great place to paint. Proper air flow is a great thing and a professional could not live without it. Unfortunately, many of us who do this as a hobby have to make do with facilities that are less than ideal. When that is the case, we need to work smart to obtain the best results possible.

John
John, I agree. I try to work smart and make do with what I have to work with.
Spray toward your exhaust not away, like John says.
When I read it with the comma, now it makes sense. Thanks.
 
#10
MX442, Chris and I are both saying the same thing.

'68 Coronet, Everybody does not have a great place to paint. Proper air flow is a great thing and a professional could not live without it. Unfortunately, many of us who do this as a hobby have to make do with facilities that are less than ideal. When that is the case, we need to work smart to obtain the best results possible.

John
John, I am one of those guys. I paint in my garage in a homemade booth.
Started with this plastic walled and small filter bank with very limited airflow.
Booth 3.JPG

Later added a framed wall with angled ceilings.
Angled Ceiling.JPG

I filter the incoming air and use a positive pressure set up that drives the overspray out the garage door. Since I live in the country on 7 acres I get away with somethings others may not.
Rear Window Installed.JPG
 
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