White sealer under SS or BC/CC Differences?

Max

Member
Occasionally in reading i'll come across the term high solids in discussions. Gets me to thinking about colors and types of paint. Right now i'm working on some old gas pumps. First one will sit outside so I want it to weather naturally after I restore it so I'm using SS paints. White & Dark Green on the sides sitting on a black base (Sinclair). Does it make a drastic difference if I were to go over a gray epoxy sealer vs a white epoxy sealer? I only have gray right now and plenty of it but next one will be Shell and i'm planning on using SPI Med Red which does ask for a white sealer... if I read correctly?
 

Max

Member
Thanks Brian, i'd be ok with that since it's just a gas pump. What's your thoughts on the white & darker green being SS.
 
So I have a question.

In the past we have used black and white squares and applied coats of paint until there was no difference in shade evident. This was called "true color" and we counted the number of coats needed to get there.

It was my understanding that those looking to lighten or darken the final look would put a white or dark sealer and then only apply enough coats to get the desired shade. This too was done with the spray out card and counting the coats to determine when the shade desired was reached.

So my question is, does none of this matter or apply anymore?
 

Jorge M.

Member
I suppose it all depends on which colors and if BC/CC or SS. Many new colors are somewhat 'translucent' and have to be sealed properly to get a good blend. If doing a complete you still want to use the right shade of sealer to avoid spraying more coats for the desired hiding. Some colors are apparently so transparent that even the sealer edge has to be a soft edge otherwise it will show up no matter how many coats you pile on.
 

Max

Member
I guess it only matters in regards to desired shade. Starting point obviously would be a paint chip sample which is what I had matched the Shell red to the SPI Med Red and it's very close. Suppose when I spray it, will be 2 coats unless I feel it needs a third to match that color or not.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Something like you are doing Max it really won't make a difference unless you are trying to match an existing color, or another pump of the same color is going to be beside it. We are talking slight variances in shade which without reference are impossible for the eye to easily discern.
Where it does matter is with blending an existing color, like during a collision repair. Slight variances in shade will be much more magnified when next to the existing finish.

'@"68 Coronet R/T Depending on what you are trying to do. Ideally doing an overall you want to get it to true coverage if for no other reason than ease of repair (blending) down the road. But if you have say, a red that you want to pop you may use a white sealer and less coats to get the look you desire. All in what you are trying to do like Jorge said.
 
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