Engine bay metal prep

jelco

Promoted Users
I’ve power washed, wire wheeled, welded holes in firewall, degreased twice. Next I’ll sand down a little more with poly carbide and 80 grit.
Unfortunately I won’t be able to sand blast the frame or remove the body from the frame
All I had was a gas-less flux welder with min/max setting. There are some pin holes in a few spots. The pinholes should be taken care of with the primer, right?

Is it even worth it to paint with good quality paint if I’m not able to get in the tights spots to remove dirt/grease?

Photo before removing fenders and before welding
E1BAAAFF-E7B7-46C3-BECB-37C6DB913571.jpeg
 
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Slofut

Promoted Users
From that point, I would have quite a few hours of hand scrubbing with red scotchbrite, wire toothbrushes and spray brake cleaner, there is factory primer left everywhere, still grease and all those cracks and crevices. Rotary brushes polish the rust, primer/paint and grease film so that it looks like bare metal. When it's really bare metal be sure to look for micro hairline cracks in the frame around holes and mounts.
 

jelco

Promoted Users
I ended up getting a portable sandblaster and made my own hood to contain the sand when I blasted the hood lever, radiator support and the headlight housings since I had them off the fender.
I’m planning on doing another pass on it but how meticulous should I be with all of this?
And I was planning on briefly wiping down with 710 solvent in case my fingers put grease marks anywhere.
 

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texasking

Promoted Users
If you are going to give them another pass, no need to wipe with anything unless there is any oil or grease on the parts. I usually clean parts like that with Dawn on a scrub brush and water before blasting. At this point, get some latex gloves, dust the parts again, blow them off and epoxy immediately. Never touch bare blasted metal with bare hands.
 

jelco

Promoted Users
I may try to take 80 grit to some of the areas instead of blasting. It’s very time consuming with a 20 gallon air compressor and reloading the 40lb blaster. I should have paid someone to do it.
 

texasking

Promoted Users
I can see where blasting with a 20 gallon compressor would be very time consuming, but you have 90% of it done. Most of that would only need a light pass. It sounds like you had the material flow too high if you had to reload the blaster to do those parts. Turn the pressure down to 40-60 psi and open the material just enough to keep a steady flow. http://www.spiuserforum.com/index.php?threads/blasting-advice.7812/ Sanding parts like those is much more time consuming than blasting to get similar results.
 
Harbor Freight equals junk in most cases.
I had one given to me but ended up changing all the valves on it. I have a 2 stage 80 gallon compressor though and that helps immensely.
Media Blasting Progress 1.JPG


After media blasting I blow everything off with compressed air with fans running to move the dust out of the booth.
Then spray two coats of epoxy mixed 1:1 using a 1.4 tip:

Engine Compartment Epoxy.JPG
 

jelco

Promoted Users
Talk about hitting every square inch! Or square millimeter! Looks nice. Harbor freight is junk but it was cheap and nearby. I had to change valves and reapply Teflon, get a different nozzle. After all the hassle it would have been easier to pay someone but I also got this stuff so I could try to blast the frame and lower part of the firewall.

Is the epoxy that glossy? Someone said they thought it looked close to stock under hood black. I was hoping it was more satin then what I see above.
 

jelco

Promoted Users
This is what the radiator support looks like after another pass, some pitting but it doesn’t look significant to me. I imagine you guys are less meticulous with radiator supports compared to fenders and other parts of the body, right?
 

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Slofut

Promoted Users
Jelco, do remember one thing. This epoxy doesn't like to be hosed on. Those parts have tons of corners crevices and divots, I would have no problem spraying them as they are, as it's getting to the point where you're at 95% rust free and the time to get further gets to be nerve wracking. But my point is to spray your first coats lightly, maybe even your first three coats. I have found if you try to get wet coats on, especially the first two or three, you can get cratering, and with carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands I really hate having to sand out cratering in tiny crevices angles and irregular surfaces. There is a little learning curve, and once you get your own technique worked out with this epoxy and with tips from this forum you'll never want to use anything else. Don't spray it dry, but if you get cratering it's probably from overlapping a spot several times, or otherwise putting it on a bit too heavy. If this happens let that coat dry for an hour, put a couple more lighter coats on with plenty dry time between coats and you'll have enough material in those spots to sand out flat without having to re-coat. But since this is a fairly high build primer, when you get it sanded out flat, like '68 said it's gonna make those parts look even better than new, and they will be ultra protected and have a great base for whatever topcoat you want to use. I prefer a black topcoat tbh... but if you can get a good looking last coat you can leave the epoxy as a topcoat. ...Light coats first ;)
 

jelco

Promoted Users
I’m definitely tired of sandblasting.
I need to re-read the proper technique for spraying paint. I have a harbor freight gun but I don’t know what kind of headache that will cause.

What do you guys like to use for the underside of the inner fenders, a truck bed liner?
 
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