Having a hell of a time stripping paint

Okay I think tomorrow I'm going to prime. How do I figure out how much primer I need to mix. I think after I mix the activator with the primer I cannot save it anymore
 
So I gave it a couple coats of primer, I'm going to let her dry for 24 hours could dry guide coat and I'm going to see what I need to repair.

So if I have very little scratches or gouges can I use glaze instead of putty

Also can you tell me what you think about that pattern it's just a little bit of primer on cardboard
 
Ok so heres where im at and i need some guidance here. I primed the bumper with 2 light coats of epoxy.

I started sanding with 220 dry on a 4 in block, here's where i think i may have added some more work for myself. When i started sanding i was a bit heavy handed. The primer started sanding and coming off, so i start thinking that's a high spot so i keep sanding. After about sanding 50% of the bumper I just kept going until it was even and most of the primer came off. then halfway through a light bulb came into my head and I started realizing this is wrong, I'm too heavy-handed and I started sanding very lightly at this point the primer turns from dark gray to light gray and I kind of figured this is what I was supposed to do in the first place.

So anyway the primer ended up being like a guide coat. Now I have half the bumper that the plastic is back showing and the other half is primer sanded correctly, I now see all the spots I have to fill in on the scratches that are a little too deep. Can I fill in the scratches with a glaze/ spot putty Right over the plastic and primer and reprime. Or do I have to use adhesion promoter on the plastic before glaze or do I have to use adhesion promoter and reprim the whole thing. I did use adhesion promoter before I primed the first time
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texasking

Active Member
You now need to start over with 320 wet, adhesion promoter over any bare plastic, and epoxy. Spray 2 wet coats, let it sit 24 hrs., then apply glaze in the low spots over the epoxy. Sand those spots just enough to level them, trying not to sand through to plastic. 320 wet would work well. Any bare plastic will need adhesion promoter before more epoxy.
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
Just like sanded through raw metal needs epoxy, sanded through primer on thermoplastics needs promoter. In the same way it can be best to just stop in an area you're sanding through & get some more coating on before continuing sanding that area. Just making more work for yourself if you don't.
Yes you can use 2 part glazing putty in scratches, don't use any 1 part crap.

In post 22 you mentioned think you can't save after mixing activator. With spi epoxy you have an average of 72 hours of pot life in a sealed container after mixing, so unlike other products you can mix more at a time & pour extra back out of gun . I usually use plastic mixing cup with lid , masking tape the lid & bring in the house to a cool spot that won't be under 65 degrees if keeping more than a day.
Live & learn, that's what we're here for. If it takes you twice as long as it should & is less than perfection, should still be 10 times better than before.
 
I appreciate everyone's input and help and yes this is a tedious job. But like everything it takes patience and experience. I'm not really looking for a showroom finish but I'm pretty sure I can get it where if someone looks at it it will look good.

So i have a few questions , I wetsanded and prined again with 3 pretty good coats.

1 question. While I was priming it there was one area that started running on the first or second coat I think it was the first, I have a picture of it here I took a scuff pad when it dried and scuffed it. Will this cause problems? Should i sand down to plastic again after 24 hrs
2 got a fly on one of the coats ,tried getting it off with a razor blade and the primer is lumpy at the area. How should I fix this and avoid later problems
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Also it's going to rain for the next few days is that going to affect anything on the bumper that's already primed if I leave it outside
 
I have another question here, The clear on my hood is peeling so I have to re-clear it. I'm pretty sure if I sanded down I got to put base over it again and then clear it. Is it best paint the bumper and the hood in one shot so it matches?
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
Will be fine outside, sun & heat will be great for it. Epoxy will dry much slower where too thick (Run) . If you're letting it sit a few days, just slightly sand the top of any runs & let dry more, doing worst of it a little at a time. Then days later what's slightly thicker should be dry enough to block out.

Did the fly do the backstroke or swim forwards? :p There too treat it like a run & gradually sand/ let dry.
Looks like part of your body line in run pic is a little more rounded off than the rest. Pay attention to them when blocking.
Generally you're more likely to have a better color match between 2 parts painting at same time, BUT isn't it a solid color black? Black is actually very forgiving in matching despite all the effort bodywork takes to make it look good.
 
Will be fine outside, sun & heat will be great for it. Epoxy will dry much slower where too thick (Run) . If you're letting it sit a few days, just slightly sand the top of any runs & let dry more, doing worst of it a little at a time. Then days later what's slightly thicker should be dry enough to block out.

Did the fly do the backstroke or swim forwards? :p There too treat it like a run & gradually sand/ let dry.
Looks like part of your body line in run pic is a little more rounded off than the rest. Pay attention to them when blocking.
Generally you're more likely to have a better color match between 2 parts painting at same time, BUT isn't it a solid color black? Black is actually very forgiving in matching despite all the effort bodywork takes to make it look good.
Yes its black. So hopefully it matches good. Since it's going to rain the next few days I want to plan my next move. I restored my headlights today and I found some surface rust on the fender. Since I'm going to do the hood also might as well get that out of the way. How should I approach this hood and this surface rust? The hood has clear that's peeling and there's also chips that look like it's going down to the primer not sure as you can see the chips that great . The hood has bird crap on it That's not a chip but there's small chips there
 

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texasking

Active Member
That hood has adhesion problems below the clear. The only way to increase longevity and chip resistance would be to strip it to the metal, epoxy and paint. The surface rust can be sanded with 80# until clean, epoxy and paint.
 
That hood has adhesion problems below the clear. The only way to increase longevity and chip resistance would be to strip it to the metal, epoxy and paint. The surface rust can be sanded with 80# until clean, epoxy and paint.
Would I have to only sand to metal where the clear is peeling and the rock chips are?
 

texasking

Active Member
Take a razor blade, start where that chunk is missing and see if it comes off in strips. You should be able to strip most of it that way. Just looking at the hood, it was not done correctly last time, so you definitely don't want to spray over it.
 

jlcustomz

evil painter
I'd say the hood matches the bumper (or did match) & should be treated as such. It's not always necessary to strip to bare metal to have a lasting show quality finish, but in cases like this, it's necessary to have an ok finish.
When I first got my black el camino in 93' (10 years old), it had some touchup & original paint cleared that was ready to delam, probably not even a few years old. I've had low cost Nason clear be intact many times longer than that. Bad previous work is pure evil & needs to go.
 
I really hope I don't have to strip all the way down. Should it be easier since it's a flat surface?. What happened with the hood is when the guy came and did my bumper, there was a few rock chips that showed ,so I asked him to respray it. He sanded it down I'm not sure what grit he used and I think he just sprayed base and clear over it. I don't know anything about body work at that time, I'm not really sure he cleaned it before sanding or used any wax and grease remover at all. Is there any way that I can get a good result without sanding the whole entire thing back to metal because this is turning into a very long process.
 
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