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1966 Mustang Coupe Restomod

#1
This is what we are starting with. There is not a lot of rust but since Ford did not prime a lot of the inner structure we will be removing all the sheetmetal do any needed rust repair and epoxy priming. The plans are to install Rod & Custom front and rear suspension, Wilwood brakes, Currie 9", AOD and a 347. The body mods will be fender flares, drip rails removed, cowl vents filled in and maybe a few other things as we go.



One of the first things we did after bracing the body was to remove the cowl



The quarter panels were removed



The roof was also removed and there was only surface rust but in a few years it will get worse if it is not cleaned up now

 
#2
I'm sure a lot of you are wondering why do we remove all the sheetmetal. The quarters were replaced at one time and we did not trust the workmanship and once they were removed we found rust in the outer wheelhouse. The roof was removed because Mustangs are known to rust in the inner structure in the front by the top of the A pillar. In this case we were lucky and only had surface rust but over time would became holes. The other area on coupes is the sail panel inner structure and we did find rust. A little rust on the left side but the right side had a few small rust holes starting.

 
#4
Do you have any dimension charts to go by? I see you guys do this all the time and without all the dimensions for the car you are working on that would be, IMO, almost impossible without knowing what the measurements are suppose to be. Especially how far you dismantle the vehicles. Your work and attention to detail are surely impressive.
 

rusty428cj

Rusty Gillis
#6
DATEC;n72886 said:
Do you have any dimension charts to go by? I see you guys do this all the time and without all the dimensions for the car you are working on that would be, IMO, almost impossible without knowing what the measurements are suppose to be. Especially how far you dismantle the vehicles. Your work and attention to detail are surely impressive.
We made two jigs one for the 65 and another for a 69 that has the correct factory suspension mounting locations. We mounted a good body on this and attached several upright supports to the front and rear frame rails. We also have several Mustangs in the shop to compare the measurements to.
 

rusty428cj

Rusty Gillis
#7
Lower cowl welded in place



The welds were ground down and epoxy was brushed on



Upper cowl fit and welded



Fender apron to cowl extensions welded in place and started to test fit the roof after it was sanded and the back side epoxy primed

 
#9
Very nice work Rusty. It's interesting to me that customers are willing to invest into these cars. And.. you never seem to run out of them.

I'm not knocking the Mustang itself, just wrapping my head around the money it takes to finish one right vs. the average selling price.
 
#10
"And... you never seem to run out of them"

I don't think I worded that right. I understand why you keep getting them because your procedures and quality is spot on. It just seems like they would dry up after awhile.
 
#11
Brian has done a lot of work since I last posted

The rear frame rails had a little rust and needed to be replaced





Test fitting the trunk floor and gas tank



Plug welding the trunk drop offs





Fitting the rear package tray and sail panels



The quarter panels were shaped wrong and had to be modified





Fitting the taillight panel and end caps



Left outer wheelhouse welded in place



The right side was to long and had to be modified



Starting to weld the sail panels



Rear panel welded in place along with the sail panels



 
#13
Wow! thats amazing - its a whole new car. So my 66 mustang project will not receive the awesome Rusty "royal treatment" that you provide but I'm wondering about recommendations of replacement panel companies you use ?

I either need new replacement stuff like compete trunk lid, fender lip or quarter panel patches or make them for the small stuff or find original used metal. I've never done a mustang so not sure of best products to pursue - any advise is much appreciated !

Thanks,
Evan
 
#14
Very nice work indeed. The only way to do it and know it will last another 50 years or more. Rusty you guys have built enough of these cars that you know where the rust is hiding. I've learned a lot just by looking at the photos. Thanks for sharing.
 
#15
edp;n73956 said:
Wow! thats amazing - its a whole new car. So my 66 mustang project will not receive the awesome Rusty "royal treatment" that you provide but I'm wondering about recommendations of replacement panel companies you use ?

I either need new replacement stuff like compete trunk lid, fender lip or quarter panel patches or make them for the small stuff or find original used metal. I've never done a mustang so not sure of best products to pursue - any advise is much appreciated !

Thanks,
Evan
I'm a Dynacorn dealer so I order direct from them for panel replacement or NPD for smaller patch panels.
 
#18
The drip rails were removed and welded



Welds ground



We still have more work to do inside the car but to stop the surface Brian sanded it down to bare metal



I sprayed two coats of SPI black epoxy and it is back in the fab shop

 
#19
Brian is welding the rear floor and modifying the inner wheelhouse for more tire clearance.





Rear bulkhead panel welded in place



Welds ground and interior sanded and ready for SPI epoxy

 
#20
We had a major set back. Brian lined up the doors but when he went to line up the fenders and hood he found a major problem. A former employee welded the front end on wrong even though he measured and remeasured before welding. There was very little gap on the left door and a large gap on the right side so the front end had to be cut off. After working on this about two weeks at my expense Brian is satisfied with how it lines up and we should be able to start charging the customer again early next week.





The replacement outer torque box had to be modified to get it to fit.