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an apology

#21
I use a supplied air system - a "hobbyair II" with a SAS full face mask. About $500 from memory and well worth it (even to the occasional "hobbyist"painter like myself ) to preserve your life. A second hose is a minor inconvenience that you get used to very quickly. A respirator - or half mask - is not good, you need a full face mask to prevent the isos and other "poisons" from entering your system via the eyes.
In hot and sweaty california it is nice to have fresh air constantly blown across your face so it is actually a positive experience to use a fresh air system.
 
#23
thanks guys . i use a full hood by bullard .. i dont trust filter mask of any kind now . this is the hood . once you get the hat and air tube they are cheap to replace . better prices can be found .
https://www.northernsafety.com/Prod...Supplied-Air-Respirator-Double-Inner-Bib-Hood

now i use a large shop vac for air . filled with ice on hot days. run it to a filter and go . or they make a charcoal filter inline . i have a plastic 55 gal drum with copper coils for my blasting booth .

i can tell you this shit i'm going through is not any fun . the surgery was hell both times but this chemo is brutal . please take care of you bags . they're all you get .
Hi Shine and sorry to hear about your health problems.

Newbie painter question just to clarify (apologies if I am a little slow to understand):
so your intake for the shop vac suction is someplace away with a clean air source,
then the air goes through the shop vac with ice in the shop vac for cooling
then the air goes out the shop vac exhaust and through a hose
to your full hood,
correct?

I was considering a Hobby Air system or similar but this sounds interesting, still effective and much cheaper.

Our thoughts and prayers are with you and your warnings are much appreciated.
 
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#24
correct. use a good filter after the shop vac . like i said i use a hood. wont work well with a mask. you'll end up with a cold .
 
#26
man it just keeps getting worse. between you tube and facebook there are so many hacks posting bs it's unbelievable . sadly many of these morons and their kids will die a horrible death way before their time. so many wearing the disposable mask that are months old and totally useless .
 

cmfisher4

Active Member
#27
I found a 3M brochure that discussed the gas filters. Essentially, the disposal requirements are: When the expiration date on package has passed (or 5 years after manufacturing date), 6 months after opening (even if unused) because the carbon will absorb stuff from the environment, when you can taste or smell contaminants, or as otherwise directed by some change schedule. The brochure was in Australian (;)) but I don't see why that would make a difference.

Write the date you started using the filters on the filters themselves. Or, write the date 6 months from when you started using them, whichever you prefer. That way, you know when they need to be replaced. If you start to taste or smell something before this date, you know that you need to shorten your change interval.

For hobbyists like me that don't paint often, it can be a great tool when weeks or months have passed since you used them last and don't remember.
 
#28
if you are using a 3m that is 6 months old dont bother . i despise 3m to start with but those bagged mask are useless after 8 to 10 hrs exposed . thats why they are cheap. left out they absorb humidity and are rendered useless .
you cant taste or smell ISO's .
 
#29
Might be wrong, but it seems to me since there is a finite amount of carbon in the cartridge respirator, how long it is effective would depend on what concentrations it gets exposed to. So for an extreme example, if you were breathing directly over the paint can, vrs in a paint booth with no air flow vrs a paint booth with good air flow, the duration of how long the carbon is effective could vary greatly. Therefore to be on the safe side, I am thinking it is probably good to swap out the cartridge earlier rather than later in actual use since you never know exactly what concentrations you are exposed to.
 
#30
3m sets the use time as 40 hrs. but i would not leave my health in their hands. if you keep the mask in the bag sealed when not in use you might get 2-3 days out of one depending on time of year and humidity. filters are cheap replace daily if your painting all day .
 
#32
a filter to stop particulates from the shop vac. not a real big deal with the hoods . i dont think it is a good way to go with a face mask .
 
#33
a filter to stop particulates from the shop vac. not a real big deal with the hoods . i dont think it is a good way to go with a face mask .

Hi Shine, hope you are getting better.

Appreciate your fresh air design. Got my hood from your source yesterday and trying to figure out how to rig up a filter.

Question please, could you just use the filter in the shop vac? Or where is a good place to buy the filter you are describing which sounds like an in-line filter?

Thanks and all the best.
 
#34
i am apologizing in advance to barry and all the faithful spi users who use spi facebook . i am about to go full tilt moron on there .
as i struggle with this chemo ( this shit is horrible ) after losing another lobe of lung about all i can do is set on my ass and hope to make it to the end of this treatment . 3 left .
now to my rant . because of they type of cancer and the strange place it began we are pretty sure my stupidity in my youth and 45 years of exposure it is paint related .
as i watch the post on there i see idiot after idiot posting pictures of them painting stuff. the latest one that just sent me over the edge is some guy teaching his son to paint . standing in the makeshift booth in juvenile shorts and a wife beater tshirt watching his son paint in a tshirt , both wearing wore out 3m disposable mask that damn sure have more than 8 hrs on them . and that is 8 hrs exposure to air not painting time . i am now a supporter of license to purchase and training certificate for painting . i refuse to even teach my god son to paint . i told him i would teach him to do other things to pay for a paint job .

so when i start a full blown pissing match with some idiot and spoil a thread on fb or even here i'm sorry . papa always said you cant fix stupid , all you can do is tie it to a tree .
 
#35
Not sure of anyone's age here, but I am 62 and I sometimes think of what I did when I was younger....it catches up to you. I'm a novice, not a pro, but have painted many things over the years, including several vehicles with ISO based products…..not to mention all the prep products including body fillers, sanding dust, blah blah. Each time I paint, I do more to protect myself, but I realize that over many decades I have touched, breathed and absorbed so many different unhealthy things that anything could happen. The young guys are the most likely to not be safe.....so, don't kid yourself, take care of yourself....use remote air supply and/or top quality, well fitted, properly dated masks, gloves, goggles, long pants/shirts....and don't stand around in the paint environment any longer than necessary. My rule of thumb is IF YOU CAN SMELL THE PAINT, YOU ARE IN DANGER. Also, unless you are susceptible to fainting, don't breathe as much when painting (I half-way hold my breath when I'm painting).
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#36
Not trying to be a smartass but. I don't think telling people to "not breathe as much" is very realistic. :) Holding your breath tenses your body and you need to be fluid when you paint. If you have a hooded supplied air system. wear gloves and a suit you are as protected as you are going to be able to be. Accumulated exposure is the real risk. As long as you take proper precautions doing one or two cars a year is not really going to be much risk. The real risk comes from doing it day in/ day out/ painting thousands of cars like Shine, myself and others. I was fortunate in that lead was pretty much on it's way out when I started. Shine probably did several thousand cars with lead paint. Painting in a properly vented booth also makes a big difference.
 
#37
hang a small particulate filter on the shop vac or one in line . just to catch anything coming out of the motor or fan . the air comes in around your neck so it is not as bad as a mask. when it's hot fill the shop vac with ice :)
worst thing i see is guys painting in shorts and tshirt wearing one of those 3m mask . money bet that it has laid around on the bench for a week . the max time on one is 40 but i believe 8hrs is more realistic .
 
#40
Not trying to be a smartass but. I don't think telling people to "not breathe as much" is very realistic. :) Holding your breath tenses your body and you need to be fluid when you paint. If you have a hooded supplied air system. wear gloves and a suit you are as protected as you are going to be able to be. Accumulated exposure is the real risk. As long as you take proper precautions doing one or two cars a year is not really going to be much risk. The real risk comes from doing it day in/ day out/ painting thousands of cars like Shine, myself and others. I was fortunate in that lead was pretty much on it's way out when I started. Shine probably did several thousand cars with lead paint. Painting in a properly vented booth also makes a big difference.
 
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